Career Services Guide: Supporting People Affected by Mental Illness

Career Services Guide: Employment is a key part of recovery

Career Services Guide: Supporting People Affected by Mental Illness
By Neasa Martin and Kathy McKee
Published by the Canadian Education and Research Institute for Counselling (CERIC)

Employment is, for most people, a focal point of social inclusion. Social inclusion is an important element of recovery from a mental illness.

But compared to people who have other disabilities, people living with mental health problems face the highest unemployment rate.

People with a mental health disorder usually must overcome employer’s and co-workers’ misunderstanding, fear, and disrespect, to get and maintain employment.

The Career Services Guide: Supporting People Affected by Mental Illness offers practical strategies to overcome the barriers that often stymie people in recovery who want to return to employment.

Inclusion is good business:
“Usually mental health problems and illnesses are framed as deficit-based disorders with little focus placed on potential advantages they may incur. An increasing focus on neuro-diversity is helping frame differences not as deficits but as different ways of thinking that can confer advantage.”

People living with mental illness can participate successfully in the workplace, and do NOT need to be symptom-free to be successful.

The book has new insights for employers, people who counsel or support a person with illness, and for job-seekers. One caveat: this book is written for a Canadian audience. Details may differ from the U.S., but the principles are the same.

You may download this 115-page book, free, by clicking here.

CERIC - Canadian Education and Research Institute in Counselling